October 18, 2017

CRK Training Times January 2016

CRK Training Times

Bits of News For Horse People

January 2016

Happy New Year!

 

Important January Dates~

Jan. 1, 2016! New Year’s Day- No Lessons

Jan. 2-10- Cheryl & Steve’s Vacation.

Jan. 16- Equine Science Classes Begin.

Jan. 19- Martin Luther King Jr. Day- Lessons as usual.

Jan. 25-30- Rider Evaluation Week

Important February Dates~

Feb.5-7- Horse Expo, Pomona

Feb. 14- Valentine’s Day Lessons as usual

Feb. 15- President’s Day Lessons as usual

___________________________________________

Welcome 2016 ~

Welcome 2016! I am very happy to welcome in the new year. I offer no resolutions, just my best effort to appreciate the things life has given me, love my family and keep my friends close to my heart. Wishing you and yours a wonder filled 2016!

No Lesson Days~

Lessons will be cancelled on the following days. Your account will be credited unless you would prefer to make up your lesson. If so, please contact the office to re-schedule. Thank you for your understanding.

Thursday Dec. 31– New Year’s Eve

Friday Jan. 1, 2016– New Year’s Day!!

Saturday Jan. 2- Sunday Jan. 10- No lessons with Cheryl. Athena will be able to pick up some of Cheryl’s lessons. Check your January statement to see if your lessons are cancelled.

How Parents Can Help Their Children Learn~

Imagine you are starting a new job with very complex skills, a demanding boss, and an all new surroundings. Sounds pretty daunting. Now imagine you can only work on these new skills for an hour a week. Now add to the mix that you are merely a child and have limited life skills. Seems downright impossible, doesn’t it?  Yet that is exactly what parents expect when children are learning to ride horses.

Learning to ride is a complex and difficult process. It takes many, many years to master. How can a parent help their child master those skills without becoming discouraged along the way? Here are some helpful tips-

1. Schedule lessons more often. Riding once per week is the bare minimum in order to advance. Less than once per week will become just like the movie Groundhog’s Day, an oft repeated set of instructions while working on the same skills over and over again. The lessons will become simply recreational riding, not actual lessons. Riding requires creating muscle memory that can only be learned from repetition. Make it possible for your student to ride more often. If cost is a factor, move into less expensive group lessons. Allow the student to take practice rides if the stable offers them. Some facilities offer discounts when lessons are taken more than once per week. Inquire about those programs. Whatever you can do to get the rider on a horse more often will help.

2. Listen to and watch your child’s lesson. Resist the temptations of email, social media and phone calls. Technology is at our fingertips 24/7, but our children grow up and move away before you know it. You paid for the lesson, be a part of it! Learn some new terms. Ask the instructor questions (After the lesson please! When the student is un-tacking is a good time.). Be involved in your child’s instruction.

3. Video the lesson. Use your smart phone to replay the lesson to your child. Visual learners will greatly benefit from seeing themselves ride. They can better identify their weaknesses and strengths. Often students simply don’t believe they really are doing the things the instructor is telling them about. Seeing video evidence will support the instructors point of view, help the student understand the principles being taught, and where the student is falling short.

4. Ask for homework. Ask the instructor for a list of terms to look up and learn. (Use your smart phone to take notes.) Drill students on the parts of the horse, bridle or saddle. Learn the names and uses of grooming tools. Go over a riding principle learned during today’s lesson. Get some stretching or coordination exercises to do at home. Even posting can be practiced in a chair or on an exercise ball. Encourage your child to do some barn homework every day. If the barn offers books, buy them and read them with your child. Otherwise, good information is available on the internet. CRK Stable offers online worksheets for the CHA Manuals. Buy the books, go to http://crktrainingstable.com/study-guides/, enter the password and get busy learning!

5. Review the lesson with your child. When you are back in the car, don’t just tick the lesson off your “to-do” list and focus on the next task at hand. Discuss what the student learned that day. Did the lesson go well? If so, comment on that, “Your posting was much better today!” (Don’t know what posting is? See #2) If the lesson didn’t go well, what did the student struggle with? How can you help them get past that difficulty? Always end the conversation on a good note. Remind them about the things that went well.

6. Review online videos and radio shows. If the barn has videos on their website, review them with your child. The Certified Horsemanship Association produces wonderful, informative videos that are available free on YouTube. Go to- http://www.youtube.com/user/chainstructor for videos or Horse Radio Network for replays of radio shows- http://www.horseradionetwork.com/

Remember, a parents job is to raise our children. Not to simply make learning opportunities available to them. Be as involved in every aspect of their lives as you can. As a parent of grown children I can honestly say I never regretted sitting on cold, hard bleachers for hours on end, watching the hundreds of practices and competitions my children participated in.  Now that those days are long past, I actually miss them…

Equine Science Classes-

In these un-mounted classes, students will learn about the care and handling of horses, stalls, tack and other equipment. Students will study from a textbook in addition to hands-on experiences handling and caring for horses, tack and facilities. Homework is also assigned most weeks. Classes are open to anyone ages 8 years to adult, Beginners through Level 2. Minimum of 4 students and a maximum of 8 students per class. Students will handle horses so proper attire is required- Long pants, fitted, sleeved shirt, and closed shoes.

Session One begins Jan. 16, 2016, 4:30-5:30 PM.. Session Two Begins Feb. 27, 2016, 4:30-5:30 PM.

$75.00/ 6 weeks or $135.00/12 weeks. (Session one is a pre-requisite for Session Two. Must register for 12 week class before taking session one to receive the discounted price.) One time textbook purchase required $40.00. For more information please go to- http://crktrainingstable.com/classes-for-home-schools-others/equine-science-level-1-syllabus/

Rider Evaluations & Written Tests~

          All riders will be given written riding evaluations the week of January 25-30, 2016. These evaluations will take place during your normal lesson time. Once you pass your level’s riding test, you may sign up to take the written and practical tests. Written and Practical tests will be given on Sunday, January 31 at 2:00 PM. Riders who pass all 3 tests will receive their certificate and patch and move on to the next level. Remember if you miss this evaluation week, you may request a riding evaluation at any time. Good Luck!

Vacation Time! 

Steve and Cheryl will be taking a cruise to enjoy some time with their son, Senior Airman Chris Torrez and his new wife, Sarah. We will be out of town between January 2-10, 2015. Athena will be giving lessons as usual. See your January statement to see if your lessons will be cancelled. Cancelled lessons will show as a credit. If no credit was issued for your lesson day, it will be with Athena at the usual time. If you have any questions or wish to reschedule, please contact us at 714-693-4886. Thank you for your understanding!

Horse Expo Pomona~

          All things horse invade Pomona! Horse Expo comes to the Los Angeles Fairgrounds February 5-7, 2016. There will be speakers, demonstrations, food, riding and the most popular event- SHOPPING! You can buy your tickets online or at the door, just remember to bring cash. For more information go to- http://horseexpoevents.com/  See you at the EXPO!

Quotable Quotes~

“Do not fear mistakes, there are none.”X – Miles Davis

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.” X – Mark Twain

That’s All For Now~ We hope you have enjoyed this newsletter. If you would like to be removed from the list use the unsubscribe at the bottom of this email. If you have any questions contact Cheryl directly at

E-mail at: CRKStable@aol.com.

Web Site: www.CRKTrainingstable.com

or snail mail at:

18245 Bastanchury Road

Yorba Linda, CA 92886

or phone (714) 693-4886

 

That’s all folks!

Open House at CRK

FREE OPEN HOUSE

Sunday 12/14/14   12:00-4:00

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  • Horseback Riding Demonstrations

  • Petting Zoo

  • Barn Tours

  • Learn About Our Horsemanship Programs

  • Free Class- How To Choose A Riding Program

  • Scavenger Hunt

  • Special Holiday Lesson Packages Available

  • All Ages Welcome

  • Extra Discounts available only at the open house

For more information please call- 714-693-4886

For your safety, please wear closed shoes when visiting the ranch.

Open House Schedule-

12:00- Welcome new friends!

12:30- Riding Demonstration

1:00- Informative Talk- How To Choose A Riding Program

1:30- CRK Horsemanship Programs Overview

2:00- Barn Tour

3:00- CRK Horsemanship Programs Overview

4:00- Happy Trails to all our new friends!

 Ongoing-

Meet The Horses!

Learn How to Brush a Horse

Petting Zoo

Scavenger Hunt

Lesson Program Sign Up

 

 

CRK Training Times October 2013

CRK Training Times

Bits of News For Horse People

October 2013

 Welcome Fall!

 Happy Fall!

Important October Dates~

Oct. 14- Columbus Day- Lessons as usual

Oct. 27- Western Dressage Show- Norco

Oct. 31- Happy Halloween!!

Important November Dates~

Nov. 3- Daylight Savings time ends. Remember to set your clocks back!

Nov. 8- YLCR Banquet- No Lessons after 4:30 PM.

Nov. 11- Veterans Day- Lessons as usual

Nov. 28- Thanksgiving Day- No Lessons

Important December Dates~

Dec. 21- First Day of Winter

Dec. 24- Christmas Eve- No Lessons

Dec. 25. Christmas- No Lessons

Dec. 31- New Year’s Eve- No Lessons

Important January Dates~

January 1 2014! New Year’s Day- No Lessons

No Lesson Days~

No lessons will be held on the following days. Your account will be credited. Please make a note of it. If you would prefer to reschedule your lesson, please call the office. Thank You!

Friday Nov. 8 after 4:30 pm,

Thursday Nov. 28- Thanksgiving

Tuesday Dec. 24- Christmas Eve

Wednesday Dec. 25. Christmas Day

Tuesday Dec. 31- New Year’s Eve

Wednesday Jan. 1, 2014- New Year’s Day!!

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4h horseYorba Linda Cloverleafs 4H Horse Project~             

Do you want to learn all about horses?

Do you want to make lots of horse loving friends?

Do you own a horse and want to compete?

Do you not own a horse and want to compete?

HORSE PROJECT IS FOR YOU!

  • ·       Who should Join?- Horse lovers between the ages of 9-19.
  • ·       Who teaches the project? Leader- Athena Fosnight: 4H State Champion English Rider, State Champion in Horse Bowl, Hippology and Demonstration. Asst. Leader- Cheryl R. Kronsberg: Former Horse Project Leader, Master Riding Instructor and AQHA Prof. Horsewoman
  • ·       What happens at Horse Project Meetings? Each month will have a different topic to learn. Members will also play games, work with horses, go on field trips, make friends and have fun!
  • ·       When are the meetings? The YL Cloverleafs meet on the 2nd Monday each month. Horse project meets the 2nd Friday of the month.
  • ·       Where are the meetings? Horse Project will meet at CRK Training Stable in Yorba Linda.
  • ·       How much does it cost? Horse & Pony project cost just $10.00 for the entire year + 4H membership fees.
  • ·       Do I need a horse to join? No, horse ownership is not required, but it helps! You do need your own horse to ride in 4H Horse Shows.

How do I sign up? Attend the YL Cloverleafs meeting at the YL Library on October 13th @7:00 pm or contact the leaders by calling or emailing CRK Training Stable.

 CHA Region 10 Conference~

            The CHA Region 10 Conference for 2013 is now history. If you missed out, you missed a lot! We had wonderful weather which is very important in Norco! Our speakers and presenters were fabulous. Many people came from far and near to attend. We even has someone come all the way from Arizona!

            The silent auction was great fun. The bidding got fast and furious during the last few minutes with many bidders being denied their prize at the very last second. I’m reluctant to report that I may have overspent my budget, but at least I came home with some very nice items! The trivia contest was greatly enjoyed with everyone who participated learning something new.

            All the riders had a wonderful time riding at this spectacular facility. They benefited significantly from the information and new skills they learned. It was a fantastic day of equine education for spectators, horses and riders alike.

            Start planning now to attend next year’s Conference. Tentative plans are to hold it at the same location  in Norco during the final weeks of September. So mark your calendars now!  

Horse Show News~

It’s a good thing we had a break in the show season. I’d have hated to show during this crazy, long heat wave! Congratulations to Caroline Ong and Justice for winning the YLCR English W/T Year End High Point!!! Be sure to ask to see Caroline’s shiny new award buckle!!  

We Did It Again! New Horse~ 

Charlie

         Another new, long face has arrived at CRK.  Charlie was just purchased. He’s a Pinto gelding, 14 hands, bay tobiano, 12 years old. Charlie is very sweet, kind and honest. He loves to go out on trail and even jumps! Charlie is big bodied enough for adults and gentle enough for kids! Be sure to look for Charlie the next time you’re at the barn! He should be working in the lesson program very soon!

New Group Lessons~

            Now that the kids are going back to school it’s time to shake up the lesson schedule a bit. The following new group lessons began in September. If you have been recommended to go into group lesson, pick one and sign up today! All group lesson riders must be capable of catching, tying, grooming, tacking, cooling out, un-tacking and putting their horse away without supervision.  Call Cheryl to sign up today!

            Saturdays- 3:00-4:00pm- English or Western, Level 3+. Riders must be confident at walk, jog/trot, and canter/lope. During this class riders will learn to recognize leads and begin working over poles at trot and canter/lope. This class has room for 3 riders.

            Saturdays- 4:00-5:00 pm. English or Western Level 2+. Riders must be confident at walk, sitting jog/trot and posting trot. During this class riders will begin working toward canter and become more confident at recognizing diagonals. This class has room for 6 riders.

Blanket Season~

Blanket service will be available beginning October 1, 2011. If you sign up for blanket service, CRK staff will manage your horse’s blanketing needs. CRK Training Stable staff blankets according to the temperature, not according to the clock. Blankets are put on or taken off when the temperature is approximately 55-60 degrees. Blankets may be left on or off as weather conditions warrant.

Blanket service is billed on a monthly basis only. Partial months will be charged $3.00 per day. To request blanket service for your horse(s), please fill out a blanket service request form and place it, with payment, in the payment mailbox. The appropriate charge will then be added to your future statements. 

Full service: $70.00 mo. -Includes putting the horse’s blanket on in the evening and removing it in the morning.($30.00 if the horse is in full training.)

Partial service: $40.00 mo. – Includes removing the blanket in the mornings OR putting it on at night.  

Vacation blanketing: $3.00 per day (am & pm)

Emergency blanketing or removal $5.00 per occurrence. You must call to request emergency blanket service. Keep in mind that we are not always on the ranch and may not be available.

            CRK Stable reserves the right to charge extra or deny blanketing service for difficult or uncooperative horses. An extra charge may also apply to train horses to stand to be blanketed.  

Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you and your horse!

 Quotable Quotes~

“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.” – Sir Winston Churchill

 “Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must first be overcome.” – Samuel Johnson

       That’s all folks!

 

A Day of Equine Education!

    CERTIFIED HORSEMANSHIP ASSOCIATION
REGION 10 CONFERENCE
SEPTEMBER 21, 2013

“A Day of Equine Education”

DSC03565 DSC03538 DSC03773 DSC03546 078
Great Speakers!
Group Riding Lessons
Private Lessons
Networking Opportunities!
Silent Auction

What is it?- An educational event with Speakers, Riding Demonstrations, Silent Auction, Vendors and Private Riding Lessons

Where Is It? PepperGlen Farms 3563 Pedley Ave. Norco, CA  92860.

Who Can Attend?- Anyone who loves horses!

Who can ride in the lessons & demonstrations? Riders must be at least 9 yrs old, bring your own horse & tack and be able to ride a walk, jog/trot and lope/canter.

How much does it cost?- Spectator Pre-sale tickets $40.00 w/lunch included. Children under 14 years $25.00. At the gate tickets $45.00/$30.00 no lunch. Riders are $25.00 per lesson or $110.00 all day in addition to spectator fee. Stalls $10.00-20.00 per day. Private lessons $25.00/30 min. Lunch tickets $8.00.

How do I sign up?- Spectators may purchase tickets at www.Eventbrite.com. Search for “CHA Conference”. Pre-sale ends September 15, 2013 @ 6:00 pm or when sold out.

Riders must contact Cheryl R. Kronsberg directly. Rider spots and stalls must be paid in advance.

 For More Information-  714-693-4886    

Or to register-      http://crktrainingstable.com/cha-conference-2013/conference-registration/

CHA REGION 10 CONFERENCE

“A Day of Equine Education”

Speaker and Demonstration Schedule

8:00 -8:30– Registration and Introductions.

       Silent Auction and Vendor Booths Open

Main Arena Riding Demonstrations-

8:30-9:30How to “Open the Doors” for Riding Success- Dallas McClemons- CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

 9:45-10:45-“Sideways”-Teaching Sidepass and Pivot to riders and horses- Cheryl Rohnke Kronsberg-CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

11:00-12:00Canter/Lope- From first time to lead changes-  Christy Landwehr- CHA Chief Executive Officer, Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

12:00-1:00- Lunch- Included in pre-sale ticket price!

1:00-2:00Extension and Collection at all gaits- Theresa Kackert- CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

2:15-3:15How to Conduct a Safer Trail Ride– Dallas McClemons- CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

3:30- 4:30Riding Hunter Courses– Theresa Kackert- CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

All Day-  Private lessons– Sign up with your favorite instructor. Only $25.00 for 30 minutes.

Lecture Area-

8:30-9:30–   What Would You Do?- An Interactive First-Aid Experience-  Dr. David Treser, DVM-

9:45-10:45How to Save $$ on Your Taxes- Rebecca Bambarger E.A

11:00-12:00– California’s Dual Agency Law in Horse Transactions- Lisa Lerch, Esq.    

12:00-1:00- Lunch- Included in pre-sale ticket price! Keynote speaker- Christy Landwehr- Certified Horsemanship Association C.E.O., Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

1:00-2:00Bits & Bitting Demystified- Cheryl Rohnke Kronsberg- CHA Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

2:15-3:15Risk Management for All Equestrians- Christy Landwehr- CHA C.E.O.,  Master Instructor & Clinic Staff

3:30- 4:30How To Make Your Business Famous!- Suzi Carragher

4:30-5:00- Make your final silent auction bids!

5:00- Close Silent Auction & Award Trivia Contest Prizes

5:30- CHA Region 10 Meeting

For More Information-  714-693-4886    or

Or to register-      http://crktrainingstable.com/cha-conference-2013/conference-registration/

Ride the Horse and Ride the Exercise

crown

            There is an ancient story of a rich and powerful King who gathered all the wisest men in his kingdom and asked them to take on a quest. The King asked them to search the world for something that was true… always and forever TRUE. The King wanted to know that there was at least one thing he could always count on, so he would always feel secure.

            The wise men traveled the earth and conferred with other wise men. They searched and they pondered. They meditated and they discussed. They gathered all the information and experiences they could, and finally came up with only one answer.

            The wisest of the wise men approached the King and informed him that they could only find one thing in the universe that was ALWAYS true. With great anticipation and longing the King asked what it was.. The wise man looked at the King and said, “The only thing that is always true, is that everything changes.”

            This is so very true with horses and riders. Our horses are always evolving and changing. As riders we must keep up. My lesson students are always looking for something they can hang their hat on. Such as if they want to trot they would always squeeze their legs against the horses sides while making a clucking noise and the horse would always trot off. While I instruct them in the correct cues, horses can sometimes get rather opinionated about what the rider can and cannot make them do. Therefore; all riders must do at least two things- Ride the exercise and ride the horse.

            Let’s assume the exercise we are trying for is trot. The normal cue for your horse is squeeze your legs against the horses sides while IMG_0418_cropmaking a clucking noise. Well in reality that should work because that is how the horse is trained to respond. However; even the best behaved horse may be distracted by a scary bag blowing across the arena or a giant bird that just landed on the rail. In that circumstance the cue may be entirely different. You may need to get the horses attention with your reins, voice, seat or legs first. You may even need to turn the horse away from whatever is grabbing his attention. Then you can start all over with your cue, but you may have to increase the intensity of your cue all the way up to kicking or tapping with a whip.

            If the horse is just not being a willing participant in today’s little jaunt, they may require an entirely different set of cues before you can get the requested response. Using the previous example, you have used the usual cue for trot and the response was something like this- Your horse raised its head and stopped completely. Or perhaps they turned around and headed toward the gate. That horse may need to be corrected before you can get back to asking for the trot. You may need to turn the horse in a tight circle to get his feet moving again. Then you have to get the horse walking in the direction you first intended to go before you ask for the trot again.  My mantra here is the horse must be “Framed, Forward and Straight” before you can ask for a more forward gait. The horse must be-Framed– The horse should be moving in whatever frame you usually keep him in. Forward– moving willingly forward, not stopping or slowing down. Straight– not turning right or left with either his head or body. If you don’t have those three things, you chance of success goes down considerably.

            Here’s another example- Suppose the horse is cantering and you want to down transition to trot. The cues would be entirely different than trotting from walk, but the end result would be the same, a trotting horse. In this case, you might use your seat to get behind the horses motion. Or perhaps you would begin riding as if the horse was trotting. For most of my school horses, simply taking your legs off while speaking the word “easy” would be enough to make them break gait, but unless you put some leg back on after the break, you’ll be walking or maybe even stopped before you say “trot”! But, if you put too much leg back on once they break, they might just pop back up into a canter again. However; if my trusty school horse had a few days off due to rain or it’s a breezy, cold day, some pulling on the reins in addition to the other cues may be needed before you get the desired response. Posting too soon after the transition may also cause a return to canter, so it may be best to sit a few strides before you begin to post again. Of course it’s also possible that the horse is a little slow that day and wanting to walk. In that case, posting right away will get him moving out quicker and perhaps prevent a break all the way to walk.  Wow! So much can happen when all you wanted was a trot!

            Regardless of the desired outcome you must remember that every exercise with horses comes with options. You have to be willing and able to change your cues. Sometimes the cues may change every stride depending on how the horse does or doesn’t respond to them. A good rider will make the necessary adjustments to their seat, hands, legs and voice every time the horse moves. This will keep the horse moving in the desired direction, frame, speed, collection and gait. Ride the horse and ride the exercise. Being flexible and responsive will help you become the best rider you can be. And always remember what the King learned- “The only thing that is always true, is that everything changes.”changes

Cheryl Rohnke Kronsberg is a Certified Horsemanship Association Master Instructor and Clinic Instructor. Cheryl graduated from Rawhide Vocational College and Fullerton College. She is also an AQHA Professional Horseman. Cheryl has been teaching riding and horsemanship for over 35 years, training students from beginner up to world level competition. Currently she and her husband own and operate CRK Training Stable in Yorba Linda, CA. We welcome your comments and questions. Please feel free to share this article with your friends, but rights to publish this article are restricted. For more interesting articles from Cheryl go to www.crktrainingstable.com

 

 

 

 

CRK Training Times December 2012

CRK Training Times

Bits of News For Horse People

December 2012

Happy Holidays!

 Important December Dates~

Dec. 25- Christmas- No Lessons

 Important January Dates~

January 1, 2013- Happy New Year! No lessons

____________________________________

No Lesson Days~

No lessons will be held on the following days. Your account will be credited. Please make a note of it. Thank You!

December 25- Christmas

January 1, 2013- New Year’s Day

___________________________________________

A thought for this holiday season-   

        Every year we spend so much time rushing around trying to find that perfect gift for all the special people in our lives. We shop, internet surf and worry that we won’t be able to please everyone. Now is the time to sit back, take a deep breath and really look at what is important. Many years from now (or even months) all those people won’t even remember what you gave them. They probably won’t even have that gift anymore. But they will remember what you did for them. This year, try something new. Instead of buying a knick-knack,  box of candy, sweater or soap-on-a rope, give the gift of memories instead. Take that special person out for a fun day at the movies, theme park or doing some activity they have always wanted to do. If they live far away, buy a gift certificate for something different  like sky-diving, driving a race car, or horseback riding. Better yet, buy yourself a plane ticket and go visit them. Even better, buy them a plane ticket and have them visit you!

            The most important thing is to give wonderful memories and adventures, not things. You will be well remembered if you give these things. Isn’t that the best thing we can hope for out of this life, to be well remembered? We here at CRK Training Stable sincerely wish you the happiest of holidays this season. Now go out there and make some fantastic memories!

________________________________________________

Horse Care Classes~

            As we do every winter, horse care classes are once again being offered at CRK Training Stable. These classes are also listed in the City of Yorba Linda Parks & Recreation Dept. class schedule,  so they’ll fill up fast! Classes will be held on Sundays 2:00-3:30 pm. Cost for all 6 classes is only $65.00 if purchased here at the barn. If you sign up through the City the cost is $62.00 + a $10.00 material fee. Individual classes may be purchased for $15.00 each including handouts.  Here is what you have to look forward to learning this year-

            January 13- #1- Horses 101- The Nature of the Horse, Parts and Equine Terms 

            January 20- #2- Colors & Markings, Breeds of Horses, their history and common uses.

             January 27- #3- Equipment and Tack- Halters, Leads, Brushes, Saddles & Bridles  

           February 3- #4- Equine Nutrition- Feeds and Feeding 

            February 10- #5- Routine Health and Hoof Care 

            February 17- #6- How to Buy The Right Horse

            If you are interested, please fill out the form below and return with payment to the barn mailbox. Check or cash only please. If the class does not fill, all fees will be refunded.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Please sign me up for the following classes:

 

Name _____________________________________________________

 

Phone # ___________________________________________________ Email Address ______________________________________________

 _________ January 13- #1- Horses 101- The Nature of the Horse, Parts and Equine Terms $15.00

_________ January 20- #2- Colors & Markings, Breeds of Horses. $15.00

_________ January 27- #3- Equipment and Tack- Halters, Leads, Brushes, Saddles & Bridles. $15.00

_________ February 3- #4- Equine Nutrition- Feeds and Feeding. $15.00

_________ February 10- #5- Routine Health and Hoof Care. $15.00

_________ February 17- #6- How to Buy The Right Horse. $15.00

 

_________ All six classes including handouts. $65.00

 

Payment enclosed in the amount of $_______________________

 

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Weather or Not~

It’s that time of year again! Winter is now well upon us with all that it entails weather wise. Here is a reminder of how things work when the wind howls or the rain pours down. Even if you think you know our policy, please take a moment to read this again. Some things have changed recently. Thank You!

 

INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

Do not assume lessons will be cancelled without calling. You will be charged for “No-shows”

No Refunds! Credit for future lessons will be given in the event of weather cancellations. If you cancel a lesson due to the possibility of bad weather, you will be charged for the lesson. CRK Training Stable will not contact you if lessons are cancelled due to bad weather. You must call and check the answering machine at (714) 693-4886 for a lesson cancellation message. If no cancellation message is on the machine, lessons will run as scheduled. We reserve the right to have un-mounted lessons should weather or arena conditions prevent riding that day. Messages will not be available until after 8:00 A.M., so please call after that time. Please do not call the cell phone or text me without checking the answering machine first.

Rain- If it has been raining recently, please call for a message regarding lessons. If it looks like rain, but has not rained yet, plan to attend your lesson. Wind- During “Santa Ana” wind conditions, lessons may be cancelled. Please call for a message regarding lessons. Keep in mind that wind conditions change rapidly, so call often. Heat- Lesson will run as usual during hot days so bring a water bottle, wear your sunscreen and bring a hat to wear while grooming.

Credits for weather cancelled lessons must be used within 60 days. Accounts with credits will be deleted after that time and credits are never carried over into a new year. Please plan accordingly. Please see the lesson policy for more details on make-up lessons.

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New Group Lessons & Make-up Opportunities ~

            New Group lesson begins in January 2013- Beginning in January a new level 2 group will be offered on Saturdays at 10:00am. If you have been approved to ride in a Level 2 group, here’s your chance! Cost for the month is only $180.00. Contact Cheryl before the end of December to reserve your space and horse. Ask to see the group lesson policy for more details.

            Effective November 2012 group make-up lessons will be offered on the last Sunday of the month at 11:00 am and/or 12:00 noon.  If you need to cancel your group lesson sometime during the month and are not able to make it up on another day, sign up for the “last day” make-up. November’s make-up lesson(s) will be held on Sunday, November 25th at 11:00 am. The December make-up lesson will be held on Sunday,  December 30th. Riders should arrive 20 minutes early to begin grooming and be ready to ride at the start time of the lesson. Remember, you must sign up to ride in this lesson and all make-up lessons must be taken within 30 days of the cancelled lesson or be forfeited.  

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Blanket Season~

Blanket service will be available beginning October 1, 2011. If you sign up for blanket service, CRK staff will manage your horses blanketing needs. CRK Training Stable staff blankets according to the temperature, not according to the clock. Blankets are put on or taken off when the temperature is approximately 65 degrees. Blankets will be left on or off as weather conditions warrant.

Blanket service is billed on a monthly basis only. Partial months will be charged $3.00 per day. To request blanket service for your horse(s), please fill out a blanket service request form and place it, with payment, in the payment mailbox. The appropriate charge will then be added to your next statement.

 

Full service: $70.00 mo. -Includes putting the horse’s blanket on in the evening and removing it in the morning.($30.00 if the horse is in full training.)

Partial service: $40.00 mo. – Includes removing the blanket in the mornings OR putting it on at night. 

Vacation blanketing: $3.00 per day (am & pm)

Emergency blanketing or removal $5.00 per occurrence. You must call to request emergency blanket service. Keep in mind that Cheryl is not always on the ranch and may not be available.

            CRK Stable reserves the right to charge extra or deny blanketing service for difficult or uncooperative horses. An extra charge may also apply to train horses to stand to be blanketed.

Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you and your horse!
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   What Do You Want For Christmas?

A poem sent to Dear Appy(Abby?)from a couple who have too much stuff.

So many of you asked us (since Yuletide’s drawing near)

“What do you want for Christmas? What can we give you this year?”

If we say, “We want nothing!” you buy something anyway.

So here’s a list of what we’d like; believe now what we say:

Pajamas for a little child, food to feed the poor.

Blankets for a shelter, and we ask a little bit more-

Perform good deeds and let us know, or volunteer your time.

These last are worth a fortune, and they needn’t cost a dime.

We have to many thing now, vases, candles, CD’s and clocks.

We have our fill of ties, underwear and socks.

Candy is too fattening, crossword books we’ve more than 20.

We don’t need trays or plates or cups, and knickknacks we have plenty.

 We’ve no wall to hang more pictures; we have books we’ve not yet read; So please take what you’d spend on us and help the poor instead!

 Just send a Christmas card to us and tell us what you’ve done;

We’ll open them on Christmas Day, and read them one by one.

It won’t cost as much for postage as a package sent would do.

You’ll need no wrapping paper, ribbons, ink or glue.

And we’ll thank God you listened to what we had to say.

So we could be the instruments to help someone this way!

Author unknown

Cheryl and Steve’s favorite charities are:

U.S.O. and The Wounded Warrior Project.

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Quotable Quotes~

“There are no shortcuts to any place worth going.” – Beverly Sills

“We should be too big to take offense and too noble to give it.” – Abraham Lincoln

“Parties who want milk should not seat themselves on a stool in the middle of the field in hope that the cow will back up to them.” – Elbert Hubbard

 

That’s all folks!

 

CRK Training Times October 2012

CRK Training Times

Bits of News For Horse People

October 2012

Happy Fall!

 

 

Important October Dates~

Oct. 8- Columbus Day- Lessons as usual

Oct. 11-17- CHA National Conference

Oct. 21- Mira Loma Schooling Show

Oct. 31- Halloween- Lessons as usual

Important November Dates~

 Nov. 4- Daylight Savings Time ends Nov. 11- Veterans Day-

Nov. 11- Mira Loma Schooling Show

Nov. 22- Thanksgiving Day- NO LESSONS

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No Lesson Days~

No lessons will be held on the following days. Your account will be credited. Please make a note of it. Thank You!

Nov. 22- Thanksgiving Day

Alternate Instructor Days~

          October 10-17, 2012- All lessons will be given by Athena Fosnight as Cheryl will be at the CHA Conference in Oregon. If you would prefer to have your lesson with Cheryl, please call her to reschedule before October 8th. All lessons must be made up within 30 days or be forfeited. If we don’t hear from you by Oct. 8th  your lesson will run as scheduled.

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Yorba Linda Cloverleafs 4H Horse Project~

             

Do you want to learn all about horses?

Do you want to make lots of horse loving friends?

Do you own a horse and want to compete?

Do you not own a horse and want to compete?

HORSE PROJECT IS FOR YOU!

  •       Who should Join?- Horse lovers between the ages of 9-19.
  •       Who teaches the project? Leader- Athena Fosnight: 4H State Champion English Rider, State Champion in Horse Bowl, Hippology and Demonstration. Asst. Leader- Cheryl R. Kronsberg: Former Horse Project Leader, Master Riding Instructor and AQHA Prof. Horsewoman
  •       What happens at Horse Project Meetings? Each month will have a different topic to learn. Members will also play games, work with horses, go on field trips, make friends and have fun!
  •       When are the meetings? The YL Cloverleafs meet on the 2nd Monday each month. Horse project meets the 2nd Friday of the month.
  •       Where are the meetings? Horse Project will meet at CRK Training Stable in Yorba Linda.
  •       How much does it cost? Horse & Pony project cost just $10.00 for the entire year + 4H membership fees.
  •       Do I need a horse to join? No, horse ownership is not required, but it helps! You do need your own horse to ride in 4H Horse Shows.
  •       How do I sign up? Attend the YL Cloverleafs meeting at the YL Library on October 8th @7:00 pm or contact the leaders by calling or emailing CRK Training Stable. _________________________________________

Certified Horsemanship Association News ~

International Conference-

          The CHA International conference will be held in Silverton, Oregon, just one hour outside of Portland, on October 11-14, 2012. Just like the regional conference, many speakers and other classes will be available for the attendees to participate in. This event is open to the public and meals are included. For more information please go to-http://cha-ahse.org/store/pages/47/International_Conference.html

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Horse Show News~

It’s a good thing we had a break in the show season. I’d have hated to show during this crazy, long heat wave! The next show for the 2012 season will be the October 21st Mira Loma Schooling Show. Be sure to look for the sign-up sheet on the board before the show. If you don’t sign up, you don’t go!

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Blanket Season~

Blanket service will be available beginning October 1, 2011. If you sign up for blanket service, CRK staff will manage your horses blanketing needs. CRK Training Stable staff blankets according to the temperature, not according to the clock. Blankets are put on or taken off when the temperature is approximately 65 degrees. Blankets will be left on or off as weather conditions warrant.

Blanket service is billed on a monthly basis only. Partial months will be charged $3.00 per day. To request blanket service for your horse(s), please fill out a blanket service request form and place it, with payment, in the payment mailbox. The appropriate charge will then be added to your next statement.

 Full service: $70.00 mo. -Includes putting the horse’s blanket on in the evening and removing it in the morning.($30.00 if the horse is in full training.)

Partial service: $40.00 mo. – Includes removing the blanket in the mornings OR putting it on at night. 

Vacation blanketing: $3.00 per day (am & pm)

Emergency blanketing or removal $5.00 per occurrence. You must call to request emergency blanket service. Keep in mind that Cheryl is not always on the ranch and may not be available.

            CRK Stable reserves the right to charge extra or deny blanketing service for difficult or uncooperative horses. An extra charge may also apply to train horses to stand to be blanketed.

 Thank you for allowing us to be of service to you and your horse!

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Stall Bedding~

            What is bedding? Are we talking about sheets and blankets? Do horses need bedding? Why spend the time, effort and money (lots of money!)  for stuff a horse is just going to poop and pee in? Once you put it in, you just have to take it back out again!

            Bedding is needed in horses stalls to keep it soft, absorb urine and prevent the sores horses get from lying on a hard surface.  Bedding can take many forms. Here in California the usual ones include straw, shavings and sawdust. Here at CRK Training Stable we use a pelleted form of sawdust. This bedding is spread in the stall and watered. It then expands into a sawdust. This makes a comfortable, absorbent bed for the horses. Most of the stalls receive 2 or 3- 50# bags of bedding per month, depending on the size of the stall.

            When the stalls are cleaned, the manure is sifted out of the bedding. Some bedding will be inadvertently thrown away with the manure. Wet bedding is also removed and discarded.  Most of the bedding will remain in the stall from day to day. This normal cleaning process can produce an excessive buildup of old, dirty bedding. Every so often, the stall should be stripped of all old bedding and replaced with new.

             A properly bedded stall will improve the horses comfort and health.  However; if the stall has too much old bedding, problems can arise. It can become a health hazard because of excess dust. It can also pack down in mounds which will increase the chances of a horse becoming cast. Also, excessive bedding in pipe corrals is pushed into the aisle ways creating extra work to rake it back in. Excessive bedding also makes it difficult if not impossible to properly clean the stall and increases the time needed to clean that stall. Disposal costs also increase with each additional bag of bedding. Anything put in a stall must come out at some point. Once it comes out it must be hauled away.

  You can tell if your stall is over- bedded by looking for these signs-

  1.      Uneven stall floor with mounds of bedding pushed towards the back or sides.
  2.      The horses hooves seem to disappear when he’s in the stall.
  3.      Bedding is being pushed out the sides, back or front of pipe stalls and the doors of box stalls.
  4.      The horse appears to have a “wallow” or deep depression in the stall.
  5.      Many small pieces of manure remain in the stall after cleaning.
  6.     The bedding is “banked” deeply against the walls of a box stall.

            Currently several stalls at CRK have excessive bedding. We are slowly removing the old bedding from these stalls.  This must be done as a gradual process due to our limited disposal resources.  Therefore, we are requesting that boarders not add any additional bedding to the stalls at this time. Once we have removed the old bedding, we will add new bedding to a suitable level.

            Here at CRK Stable the appropriate amount of bedding is provided for most horses. If you feel your horse needs more bedding than is provided, please contact us. We don’t want to have to charge an excessive bedding fee, but it may become necessary if our labor and disposal costs continue to rise. If your horse has a health issue that requires a deeply bedded stall, please let us know so we can work with you to resolve the situation.  Thank you for your understanding.

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Quotable Quotes~

 “Sometimes when we are generous in small, barely detectable ways it can change someone else’s life forever.” – Margaret Cho

           “Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” – Mahatma Gandhi

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 That’s All For Now~

We hope you have enjoyed this newsletter. If you would like to be removed from the list or have any questions, please contact Cheryl directly. She may be contacted by E-mail at: CRKStable@aol.com

or snail mail at:

18245 Bastanchury Road

Yorba Linda, CA 92886

or phone (714) 693-4886

 

That’s all folks!

 

Crime and Punishment

“I praise loudly. I blame softly.” ~~ Catherine the Great

            Just the other day I was asked an interesting question by a student. She had recently begun taking lessons with me after several years with another trainer. She said one of the reasons she changed trainers is that she felt the previous trainer was too harsh with her horses. What she then asked me was, “Would you rather be too hard on a horse or too easy?”

            An interesting question to be sure. If those are the only choices, which would you choose? Neither option is best for horse or rider, but if you had to choose only one, which would it be? When I was asked this question the answer came easily and quickly- I would much rather be too easy. Immediately after that answer, came the natural follow-up question, “Why?”

            Ah yes, why indeed… In my 30 + years of training horses I have developed my own way of working with these wonderful animals. I never forget that they allow us to sit on their backs and direct their every movement and even their very thoughts. They allow us to choose where they will stand to be groomed, when they will pick up their feet and they put up with being saddled and bridled. They allow us to decide what gait they will be in and how fast or slow that gait will be. I am always aware that, given the proper incentive, every horse can dump my sorry behind into the dirt at any given moment. I constantly do my best not to give them that incentive. Some may say I’m not taking control of my horses or the situation. Not true. I just remember who has the real control here. I respect the power horses have and their willingness to relinquish that power to us. As long as we don’t abuse it.

            Over the years, I have seen lots of abuse in the name of “taking control”. The large breed organizations do their best to keep it from happening.  AQHA requires its Professional Horsemen, like me, to sign an oath to protect horses from abuse. If we see it going on at a show, we are obligated to report it. But what about at home?  Who do we report to back at our own barn? Well, the horses of course! We all owe our horses our respect. They are living, breathing, feeling animals that deserve to be treated with kindness and fairness.

        I describe abuse as a correction that does not fit the crime. Here’s an example- A riding instructor is teaching a group of students riding Hunt Seat on their own horses. During the lesson they are asked to drop the stirrups at the posting trot. One rider isn’t as secure as she should be and grabs the horses’ sides with her spurs. The horse responds properly by trotting faster. Now the rider is desperate to stay on, so they dig in even more. Soon the horse starts bucking and the rider falls off. The horse, now relieved of the painful spur pressure, stops and looks down at the rider as if to say, “How’d you get down there and why did you do that?”

         Now the trainer steps in and grabs the horse and starts jerking on the reins and hitting the horse. The horse tries to run away from the trainer so more correction is applied in the form of more jerking on the reins and more hitting. Soon the horse is in a full panic, trying to get away. This is answered with more beating until the trainer finally has vented all their wrath and stops. The horse is now standing still, covered in sweat, shaking with fear and covered with welts.  The student is crying and scared to death. The parents are mortified.  The remaining students are completely baffled about what happened to cause this outburst, confused about what to do next and fearful of the trainer.

        When the parent steps in to confront the trainer, she defends it by saying that the horse could not be allowed to get away with bucking the child off. Since the child was not able to correct the horse, she had to. Now the horse will know better and won’t do it again.

        In my opinion, this is a perfect example of the punishment not fitting the crime. First, the crime was only that the horse bucked, not that the child fell off. And the buck was clearly provoked by the child spurring the horse. But, provoked or not, horses aren’t supposed to buck with a rider. However; the moment that a correction could have been beneficial was missed because the rider fell.  The only thing the horse understood was that it was being punished for stopping when the rider fell off, the last behavior it did. The correction happened long past the moment when it would have had any effect on the bucking behavior. And the correction did not fit the crime (bucking when provoked); therefore it was abuse.

        Now correction or punishment is a fact of life for everyone. Children have time outs. Adults get traffic tickets, fines or jail time. Horses get bitten or kicked by herd members. It helps keep order in societies. It facilitates learning. It is necessary and even beneficial. But abuse does none of those things. Abuse causes fear, resentment and warps minds. Abused children will never reach their full potential. Abused adults feel trapped and lash out at others. Abused horses will either become unmanageable or shut down completely. Abusers become trapped in their own abuse, never learning better ways to cope with anger, fear and loss of control.  Abuse never works, never helps and is never the answer.

        So the next time your horse makes a mistake, give them another chance. If the mistake didn’t get anyone hurt, just try it again. Don’t make matters worse with your correction.  Always respect the effort. Always acknowledge the triumph. Always finish on a good note. Punish seldom and always, always make sure the punishment fits the crime.

Cheryl Rohnke Kronsberg is a Certified Horsemanship Association Master Instructor and Clinic Instructor. She is also an AQHA Professional Horseman. Cheryl has been teaching riding and horsemanship for over 30 years. Currently she and her husband own and operate CRK Training Stable in Yorba Linda, CA. We welcome your comments and questions. Please feel free to share this article with your friends, but rights to publish this article are restricted. For more interesting articles from Cheryl go to www.crktrainingstable.com

 

 

 

 

Should I Change My Horse’s Bit?

Should I Change My Horse’s Bit?

     This is a question I received last week. The client wanted to know if they needed a new bit for their horse. Since this customer was a boarding client and not in a lesson or training program, I hadn’t really paid much attention to how the horse worked. The question was asked in the barn aisle, so I couldn’t see the horse work either. The owner was not willing to pay for an evaluation so I was reduced to giving out some general information. The next time I saw them riding, the bid had been changed.  The owner stated that the horse went better with the new bit. Happy ending?  Maybe. Maybe not. I didn’t evaluate the horse either time, so I don’t really know for sure. I guess time will tell.

     So the question of the week is- Should you change your horse’s bit? There are several reasons it could be time for a change. The most common one is that the horse isn’t responding to the bit correctly. Sometimes the horse will be non-responsive. That might call for a change to a more “severe” bit. Sometimes the horse is over-responsive. That could mean they need a “milder” bit. Just remember that no bit is a “magic-bullet”. Often what a horse really needs is training, not a different bit. Or perhaps, the rider isn’t cueing the horse properly. But those are talks for another day.

     Another reason to change bits is due to horse show rules. Let’s say you ride western and compete with your horse. Your horse is great at western pleasure and the trail classes.  Western horse’s younger than 6 may be shown two-handed in a smooth snaffle bit, which is the bit most horses are started in. Once that same western horse is 6 years of age or older, they must be shown in a curb bit ridden with one hand on the reins. Therefore, when they turn six, it becomes necessary to change to a curb bit. A curb bit is generally more “severe” than a snaffle bit. If you want to continue showing western you have no choice in the matter. You must make the change in bit and be sure your horse is trained to handle it.

     Today, I’m going to address the first scenario. How do you know your horse is in the wrong bit? An over-bitted horse will display some of the following signs when the reins are pulled. If the horse is over-bitted long enough, these signs will show up even without any rein pressure. (FYI- I have found more over-bitted than under-bitted horses during my years as a trainer.)  Here’s what to look for:

  1.  Over-flexing to the side or at the poll.
  2.  Refusing to move forward.
  3.  Head tossing.
  4.  Pulling on the bit.
  5.  Rearing.
  6.  Refusing to stop or give to the bit.
  7.  Chomping on the bit.

 The under-bitted horse will show some or all of these signs:

  1.  Not turning or bending when asked.
  2.  Pulling on the bit.
  3.  Head tossing
  4.  Nosing out
  5.  Refusing to stop.
  6.  Not giving to the bit.
  7.  Hanging on the bit or leaning on the riders hands.
  8.  Being very “heavy” on a bit he used to respond well to.

      Now that you recognize you have a problem, how do you know which one you have? As you can see, the signs of over-biting and under-biting can be similar or exactly the same! It may be best to consult a professional to help. This situation can be very complex and requires personal attention. If your horse is displaying some of these signs, be sure to address it quickly, before it becomes unsafe. A horse you can’t control, that is uncomfortable or in pain can very rapidly become hazardous to ride. Contact your local Certified Instructor and set up an evaluation lesson. They should be able to tell you what the actual problem is and help you resolve it.

      When I have been presented with this situation, I follow these steps. First, I will observe the horse being ridden while asking relevant questions. Sometimes I will ride the horse. If I decide the problem is indeed the bit, I determine if the current bit is too mild or too severe. Then we will try out a few different bits to see which one helps. After we have settled on one bit, I will let them borrow it for a week or so.

     After the trial period, if the new bit is still looking good, I write a description of the bit including size, type, etc. I may even take a picture or let them take my bit as a reference when they head to the tack store. I just want to be sure they purchase the correct one. People who work in tack stores don’t always know enough about bits, so the description helps. I have even had our local tack store employees call me to ask if a bit they have in stock with a slight variation will work. Sometimes we will just order a bit from one of the many catalogs I keep on hand for just these occasions. However we go about it, I try my best to be sure the correct bit is purchased.

      What you shouldn’t do is start buying bits and trying them out on your horse. You could be making the problem worse or not solving it at all. Good bits are expensive. Many bits cost in excess of $100.00! Buy a few of those and you could pay for several months of lessons!  While a good bit is a very worthwhile investment if it works on your horse, it might become an extremely expensive paperweight if it doesn’t do the job. A trip to a trainer will cost you a little money and time, but may very well save you plenty of both in the long run. And who knows, it might not be a problem with the bit at all. In that case, think of all the money you saved not buying new bits! As an added bonus, working with a trainer, even for an hour or two, will give you new insight about your riding and your horse. And you might just have some fun as well! 

      I welcome your comments and questions about bits or other topics. Or you may attend my free Bits and Bitting class to be held in early November. Dates and details of upcoming classes will be announced soon. Feel free to share this article with your friends!